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Dr. Dwaraka Nath

Dr. Dwaraka Nath, who took his doctorate from Mangalore University in 2007 is a qualified healer in Naturopathy and Yogic sciences. The insatiable fire within, to exploit the good old Indian preventive health care strategies to its full, ended up in Mitran Foundation, dedicated to humanity.

Krishna on Bondage 11

We all have looked at statue of Buddha. Silence surrounds it, peace permeates it, and serenity emanates from it. Nothing can disturb his peace and silence. Even a pond is disturbed by passing breeze, by the rays of sun which turn it into vapour and takes it to sea as rain. Buddha is so still that he has no desire whatsoever to move to ocean of eternity. He says the ocean will have to come to him if it wants. For this reason Buddha refuses to answer questions about transcendental. Is there God? What is liberation? What happens after death? Questions like these are always shunned by Buddha. He gently laughs them by saying, “Don’t ask such questions that have to do with distant future. They will distract from immediate present, which is of the highest. The thought of distant future will give rise to desire to travel to it, and to reach it. And this desire will give restlessness. I am utterly contended with what I am, where I am. I have nowhere to go and I have nothing to choose and find. ” So Buddha is not indifferent to this world, he is also indifferent to the other world of God & nirvana.
Buddha says, “Even to find God you will have to pass through the swamp of hopes and fears, attachment and jealousies. Whatever I am, I am. I am utterly contented, I am at perfect peace.” So his indifference has no objective, no goal whatsoever to achieve. Look at Buddha’s face, his eyes and there is not a trace of agitation in them. They are as silent as silence itself. It is like a still lake where there is not even a ripple rises. Naturally Buddha’s peace is different. It can have neither Krishna’s outspoken bliss nor Mahavira’s subtle joy. It is true that a man of tremendous silence, who has no desires whatsoever- not even desire to find the ultimate- will attain to bliss without asking. But this bliss will be his inner treasure; this lamp of bliss will shine in his interiority, while his whole external milieu will be one of utter peace and silence. His halo will reflect only harmony, stillness and order. Bliss will form his base and peace will make his summit. 

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 30-06-2014

The Sales Lady

The door bell mounted at our gate rings. The gate of my house is about twenty meter apart from my bed-room window. I tried to spot the person across the courtyard. It was definitely a lady. I came out and walked towards my gate. Oh No! It was the same sales lady who has been coming to our house since many years. She always says, “Look! This is the last phenyl bottle in my hand. Please buy it from me. My husband is in the hospital. I have to buy medicines for him.” Whether it is me, my wife or my children, she always repeats the same story since ages. We all know that it is just a marketing gimmick. We had rarely bought any phenyl bottle from her, that too quite long back. I do not know why, but she always returns back to our house, asking us to buy her last phenyl bottle. When we ask her to go back, she insists two three times again. We also ask her, why she makes a false excuse every time to make a sale. She just makes a face, but never says that her excuse is false. She never objected to our statement, that she is telling a lie. I do not know what kind of marketing this is.
I have seen “Insistence Based Marketing” by many vendors either coming to the door or trying to make calls. I must have received at least fifty calls in past six months from some people claiming to be representatives of a popular telecom company. These callers ask me to convert my mobile connection from a prepaid service to a postpaid service. The callers do not even know that I am already having a post paid connection. When I enquired from the parent company, they say that many tele-callers are appointed by local dealers on their own who make such requests. For the readers I must put on record, that I already have a “Do Not Disturb” facility enabled. Request to bar the calling number is of no use as the calling number keeps changing, even when it is from the same vendor.
The point I wanted to make here is related to corporate or business morals. This kind of insistence marketing is something that needs to be re-discussed inside every small or big organisation. I did consult few advertising and promotion related books that I studied during my management course. Push based promotion is required, but unless there is a pull the customer satisfaction can never be achieved. Yes! This is a Pandora-box of a long debate. So what! This issue definitely needs a discussion on the moral grounds too.

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 25-06-2014

Krishna on Bondage 10

These few weeks let us analyze the life of great souls & try to understand their different approaches towards life. There is a good deal of similarity between Christ’s concept of neutrality, Buddha’s idea of indifference, Mahavira’s transcendence of attachment and Krishna’s non-attachment. These are the ways of looking at and meeting the world. But there are some basic differences too. While their end-points are similar, their approaches are very different. While their ultimate goal is same, they differ much in the ways and means they use to achieve their ends. 
There is deep similarity between what Christ calls neutrality or non-alignment with the world at large, and what Buddha calls indifference to it. As the world is with all its strange goings-on, its contradictions and conflicts, its struggles and trials, a seeker on the spiritual path will do well to keep a distance from it. But we must remember, neutrality can never be blissful. Deep down it makes us sad. If I don’t choose life, if I reject it completely, if I say I take neither this nor that, and then I will soon stop flowing, I will stagnate. If a river refuses to move in any direction, it will cease to flow, it will stagnate. It will turn into a closed pool. It is true that stagnant pool of water too will reach the ocean, but not in the way river reaches it. It will first vaporize under sun and then into clouds and then descend on the ocean in the form of rains. It will not have the joys of river, pushing its way to ocean, singing, dancing, and celebrating.  
Buddha’s indifference is silent, peaceful and quiet. Buddha is never sad; he is just quiet, serene and silent. If he lacks the dance of Krishna, and secret bliss of Mahavira, he is also free of sadness of Jesus- sadness for the suffering of masses. Buddha is utterly settled in his peace, his silence. Buddha has attained to indifference, which is different from neutrality. He has come to know that everything in life, as we know it, is meaningless, so nothing now is going to disturb his peace. Every alternative, every choice in life is same for him. So his stillness, his calm, his peace is total. Buddha has attained to absolute choicelessness.  For him nothing is good or bad, right or wrong, black or white. For him summer and winter, day and night, pleasure and pain, laughter and tear are the same. For him choicelessness is the choice!
More analysis will follow coming week!

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 23-06-2014

Krishna on Bondage 9

I have heard that a rebel sage (A sage is always a rebel) was thrown into prison for his irrepressible love of freedom. He was going around the country singing songs of freedom. He was a Sufi sage and his captor was a Caliph who was both the religious and temporal head of Mohemmedanism. The sage was put in shackles from his neck downward, but he continued to sing his songs of freedom. One day the Caliph came to see him and inquired if he had any troubles. The sage asked, “What troubles? I am a royal guest, your guest; what troubles can I have? I am utterly happy. I live in a hut and you have put me in a palace. Thank you! ”
The Caliph was amazed. He asked, “Are you joking?” The Sufi said, “I say so because I have turned life itself into a joke.” Then the Caliph came with a down to earth question: “Are the chains on your hands and legs heavy and painful?” The Sufi looked at his chains and said, “These chains are far away from me. There is a great distance between me and these chains. You may be under the illusion that you have imprisoned me, but you can only imprison my body, you cannot imprison my freedom. You cannot turn freedom into prison because I know how to turn prison into freedom.”
It all depends on us, on how we see things. Seeing is foundational. We have to understand what the Sufi told the Caliph, “These chains are far away from me. There is a great distance between me and these chains.” Our life becomes what we are psychologically and spiritually, our death becomes what we are in our mind and spirit. If we are free, our birth our life, our death, everything becomes free. And similarly if we are in bondage, then everything we do or we don’t do binds us. Then action binds, love binds, life binds and even death binds. Then even God binds. In fact, we are our own makers. 

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 16-06-2014

Krishna on Bondage 8

We human are the strange
creation of all. We turn even our love to bondage. I receive wedding
invitations from my friends, relatives and patient’s family. They invariably
write in their wedding invitation letters that their daughter or son is going
to be “bound with fetters of love.” We turn even love, which is utter freedom,
into shackles. Love is freedom, so the right way to say it is that someone is
going to be set free in love. But we say and do the opposite; we turn love into
an imprisonment. Not that love is imprisonment, but we make it into one. The
way we are, even death looks like captivity to us. The way we are, we turn life
itself into a concentration camp.

On the other hand, he
who lives in the present, in the moment, who among us lives without
expectations and attachments and does his work without hope for reward or fear
of punishment, whose action is like inaction and whose inaction is like action,
who turns his whole life into a play- he turns even bondage into freedom. For
such a person among us, action is freedom, love is freedom, living is freedom,
living is freedom, life is freedom, and even death is freedom. For him
everything is freedom.

It all depends on the
way we are and we see the life. We carry both our slavery and freedom within us.
If we begin to live without desire for the fruits of action, if we become
responsible to ourselves and to the existence, if we trust life, then life for
us will cease to be bondage. The life will be a blessing, a benediction. Such a
person in us attains a life of freedom; he is free while living in this world.
Such a life is possible here and now. And it totally depends on us!

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 09-06-2014

Krishna on Bondage 7

Let each of our actions, no matter whether you are peeling a potato or composing a poem, let us be complete in it. Let us leave the result to god. If we do so, Krishna says, we will be released from bondage that comes in the form of birth. Krishna does not say that birth is bondage. He only says that one who is full of expectations, who is attached to the fruits of action is always in need of tomorrow, future, future life. Among us who live in desires, in hopes and expectations anxiously seeks a new birth after his death. That person cannot escape rebirth. And for such a person birth becomes bondage and it can never become the freedom. Because such a person is not really interested in life and living, he is interested in his expectations, in the results he expects from it. For him birth is just an opportunity for achieving some results. And for such a person death is going to be very painful, because death will put an end to all desires and demands he lived for. 
Naturally when he is born again he will find his birth to be his bondage. Birth is bondage for one who does not know the life that is freedom. In fact desiring is bondage, craving and attachment to result is bondage. To live and know life totally is freedom. And for one who knows this life there is no birth and death. He is released from both birth and death. Krishna has said only the half truth; it is a half truth to say that one is released from the fetters of birth. To complete it, we should understand he is released from death as well. We are released from both birth and death. 
This does not mean that birth and death are bondage. In ignorance, for an ignorant person birth and death appear to be bondage; they bind the ignorant. For a person of wisdom among us, one who knows the truth, birth and death cease to be, he is in freedom. In fact bondage and freedom are states of mind. While the ignorant mind experiences bondage, the mind of the wise is free. Krishna does not condemn birth as such, but the way we are, birth feels like imprisonment to us.    

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 02-06-2014

Krishna on Bondage 5

Krishna’s vision of action without attachment to results is clear. He tells us to be totally in the present, in the moment. He tells us not to divide ourselves between present and future. Not even a fraction of our attention should be passed on to the future. Then only we can act wholly and joyously, and then only will our action be total. Desire for results is a distraction from action, so we must try and give up our attachment to results and be totally in action. Leave future to future, to existence. Otherwise our habit of being fragmentary will pursue us through out. And this wholeness, not our desire, will bear fruit. So we can trustfully leave the matter of fruit in the hands of God or existence or whatsoever we like to call it. I would like to explain it in a different way. Unless we make action our joy, unless we love what we do, unless we do something for the love of it, we cannot be free of our attachment to the future, to result. And unless our action flows from our being, our blissfulness, like a stream flows from its source, we cannot be totally into it. We will always tend be pulled by the future.    
Do you think a stream is flowing towards some future? Do you think a river is running to the sea? You are mistaken if you think so. It is another matter that the river reaches the ocean- but is certainly not flowing for the sake of the ocean. A river flows for the love of flowing, and this energy, this force, this strength of a river comes from its source, its original source. Of course the river reaches the sea, but it is just a by product, it is inconsequential. 
Life is a play of energy- like a river it moves with its own energy. Krishna says man should live so that his action stems from his own energy, from its innermost source. The river Ganga dances not only when she reaches the shore of the ocean, she dances on every bank. She dances through hills and valleys, through green forests and dry deserts, through cities and villages, through happiness and misery, through human beings and animals. She dances and rejoices where ever she happens to be. And if she reaches the ocean it is just a consequence which she neither desired nor expected. It is the culmination of her life’s journey. It is existence’s echo, its answer to her. 
In my view there is only one difference between a house holder and a sannyasin: a house holder lives for tomorrow, he is future oriented. A sannyasin lives and flowers now and here. He derives his strength from his today. For his today, now is enough unto itself. And when a sannyasin’s tomorrow comes, it will come in the form of his today, and he will live it the way he lives his today. In the next week I wish to share a significant episode in the life of Mohammed. Mohammed is a rare kind of sannyasin. 

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 12-05-2014

Krishna on Bondage 4

Krishna says a wise man gives up attachment to the fruits of action and attains to freedom from bondage of birth and death. The whole thing needs to be understood in depth. Firstly, Krishna does not talk about our release from action itself. He emphasizes release from attachment to the fruits of action. He does not ask us to give up action and become inactive. Krishna urges us not to do something with a motive, with an eye on results of the action. There is a meaningful difference between action and the fruit of action. I would like to go deeply into the important matter of action without attachment to its fruits, because it is really arduous. If someone tells us to do something, but not to expect any result from it, we will say,” It is sheer madness to suggest such a thing. If there is no motive to work, why should one work at all?”
This phrase, “Freedom from attachment to the fruits of action” has put many interpreters of Krishna in difficulty. So many found a clever way to circumvent the real meaning of Krishna’s teaching and bring in “Fruit of action” by the back door. They said one who relinquishes attachment to the result of one’s labour attains moksha, liberation. So the fruit of action is in the form of liberation. It is the same if we say that one attains to liberation if he gives up his attachment to fruit of action. Krishna is not providing an incentive to desire less action. An action with an incentive can never be desire less, because what is incentive but a desire for result? Krishna’s “release from bondage” is a consequence which follows desire less action as its shadow. 
Krishna does not say that those who want to be free from the bondage of birth should give up attachment to the fruit of their action. If he says so, he is providing a motive, he is contradicting himself. No, he only says that freedom or liberation is a consequence of desire less action, not its motive. One who desires liberation or freedom can find it very difficult to come to it, because desiring is the barrier. So the question is: How to work without attachment to result?  
Let us contemplate over this and later we shall analyze about two kinds of action in our life!

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 05-05-2014

Krishna on Bondage 4

We believe everything happens according to our desires and expectations. We are like that crazy old man of a fable I heard from a great master. This crazy old man lived her whole life in a village. But one fine morning he left the village in anger, cursing the villagers for lack of recognition for him and he promised to teach a lesson. He said, “I am taking with me the cock at whose crowing the sun rose here every morning. Now the sun will rise in another village where I am going.” And the story says when the old man reached another village and his cock crowed and the sun rose, he said to himself, “The idiots of that village must be weeping bitter tears, because the sun is now rising in this village and they are in dark forever.” The old man’s logic is flawless. There was no doubt left in his mind that sunrise depended on his cock’s crow. But no cocks become victim of such illusions, only their masters. This fable reflects human mind. 
The future comes on its own. We cannot prevent tomorrow from becoming today. Let us do our work and do it completely. That itself is enough. The act must be total and this is the whole of Krishna’s teaching. By total action he means, once we have done our thing we are finished with it. There is nothing more to be done about it. And if something remains to be done, even if we have to wait in expectancy of its result, then the act is not total. Our act is complete in itself when we don’t look forward to some reward, some recognition or even appreciation. For this reason Krishna says, “Leave the fruit of labour to God.” By God he does not even mean there is some accountant-cum- controller general sitting somewhere in the heavens who will take care of it on our behalf. Leaving it to God means: please do your work and leave it at that, leave it to existence.   
Existence is like a mountain which echo’s every sound uttered around it. We don’t have to wait prayerfully for the echo, after making the sound, it will happen on its own. To produce an echo, a proper sound of some volume is needed. This is how the desire for result, the tension caused by desire and expectation does not allow us to do our work rightly. People among us who are anxious for results often miss the moment of action itself. Because the moment of action is now and here, while the results lies in some future. So those of us whose eyes are set on the future are bound to miss the present. Then we don’t love our work, we love only the result. Then we don’t give our whole heart and mind to action- we do it reluctantly and haphazardly. If our attention is focused on future- and we are where our attention is- then we cannot be totally in the present. And that which is done inattentively cannot be deep and total. So it cannot be blissful. 
Let us introspect this and more elaborate answers to come in weeks that follow!

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 28-04-2014

Krishna on Bondage 3

A future oriented mind is full of desires for achieving results in the future, and its action is always fragmentary and partial. But there is no such desire for results, when the action is without any motive; such an action fills us with tremendous joy and bliss. In my understanding action without attachment to its fruits is so complete, so total, that there is nothing beyond it. It is its own fruit; it is its own end result. It is fulfilling in the moment. Such an action is its own reward; there is nothing outside of it. 
Once Jesus is passing through a village and he comes across a field full of lilies. He stops near it and says to his disciples, “Do you see these lilies?” Jesus then tells them, “It seems you are not looking, look again. How beautiful they are! King Solomon in all his grandeur and glory is not that beautiful.” The disciples are surprised to hear their master compare the lilies with King Solomon, who happened to be the wealthiest king of their times. There was, they thought, no point in comparing an ordinary flower with the wealthiest king of the world. So noticing their confusion and bewilderment, Jesus again says, “These lilies are blossoming here and now. They live and act in the moment. They don’t do anything out of hope for the future, whereas Solomon lives for the future and in the future. And this tension between the present and the future makes everything tense, sick and sometimes ugly. These flowers have no idea of tomorrow and they are fulfilled in the moment. This small piece of land on which they are growing is enough for them, they don’t crave a larger field. The wind that is passing through them, making them sway, is everything for them. The sun that is shedding light on them is more than everything they desire. These bees humming around them give them joy of the world.” 
They are contented in being what they are and being is enough, they don’t want to become anything else. Not that another moment will not come for them. It will come and it will come of its own accord. And when it comes they will welcome it and live it as totally as they are living this existing moment. Not that the lilies will not bear fruit, they will, but it will be another action complete in itself and it will arise from their existential moment. That is why they are beautiful.

A future oriented mind is full of desires for achieving results in the future, and its action is always fragmentary and partial. But there is no such desire for results, when the action is without any motive; such an action fills us with tremendous joy and bliss. In my understanding action without attachment to its fruits is so complete, so total, that there is nothing beyond it. It is its own fruit; it is its own end result. It is fulfilling in the moment. Such an action is its own reward; there is nothing outside of it. 
Once Jesus is passing through a village and he comes across a field full of lilies. He stops near it and says to his disciples, “Do you see these lilies?” Jesus then tells them, “It seems you are not looking, look again. How beautiful they are! King Solomon in all his grandeur and glory is not that beautiful.” The disciples are surprised to hear their master compare the lilies with King Solomon, who happened to be the wealthiest king of their times. There was, they thought, no point in comparing an ordinary flower with the wealthiest king of the world. So noticing their confusion and bewilderment, Jesus again says, “These lilies are blossoming here and now. They live and act in the moment. They don’t do anything out of hope for the future, whereas Solomon lives for the future and in the future. And this tension between the present and the future makes everything tense, sick and sometimes ugly. These flowers have no idea of tomorrow and they are fulfilled in the moment. This small piece of land on which they are growing is enough for them, they don’t crave a larger field. The wind that is passing through them, making them sway, is everything for them. The sun that is shedding light on them is more than everything they desire. These bees humming around them give them joy of the world.” 
They are contented in being what they are and being is enough, they don’t want to become anything else. Not that another moment will not come for them. It will come and it will come of its own accord. And when it comes they will welcome it and live it as totally as they are living this existing moment. Not that the lilies will not bear fruit, they will, but it will be another action complete in itself and it will arise from their existential moment. That is why they are beautiful.

By Dr. Dwaraka Nath on 14-04-2014