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'Indian Thoughts' was founded on 3rd June 2004 and now it is one among the best online moral education services in the world. 'Indian Thoughts' is a non-profit Organization, managed by a group of devoted social workers from India. These inspiring stories are from its' rich archive of collections.

Two Buckets in the Well

Two buckets met at the well. One of them looked morose. “What is the trouble?’ asked the second bucket sympathetically. 

“Oh! Replied the first, gloomy bucket, “I get so weary of being dragged to this well. No matter how full I am, I always come back here empty.” 

The second bucket laughed. “How curious!” the second bucket chuckled, “I always come here empty and go back full.”

Comment: 

Many a good person shares the view of the first bucket as far as frequent religious practices or spiritual direction are concerned. We find them dreary. If only we would realize how empty we go for them and how full we return!

By indian-admin on 01-08-2017

Be a Believer to be an Achiever

A professor stood before his class of 30 senior molecular biology students, about to pass out the final exam. ‘I have been privileged to be your instructor this semester, and I know how hard you have all worked to prepare for this test. I also know most of you are off to medical school or grad school next fall,’ he said to them.

‘I am well aware of how much pressure you are under to keep your GPAs up, and because I know you are all capable of understanding this material, I am prepared to offer an automatic ‘B’ to anyone who would prefer not to take the final.’

The relief was audible as a number of students jumped up to thank the professor and departed from class. The professor looked at the handful of students who remained, and offered again, ‘Any other takers? This is your last opportunity.’ One more student decided to go.

Seven students remained. The professor closed the door and took attendance. Then he handed out the final exam. There were two sentences typed on the paper:

‘Congratulations, you have just received an ‘A’ in this class. Keep believing in yourself.’

Comment: It’s the kind of test that any teacher in any discipline could and should give. Students who don’t have confidence in what they’ve learned are ‘B’ students at best. The same is true for students of real life. The ‘A’ students are those who believe in what they’re doing because they’ve learned from both successes and failures. They’ve absorbed life’s lessons, whether from formal education or the school of hard knocks, and become better people. Without faith in yourself and others, success is impossible.  Believe in yourself, even when no one else does.

By indian-admin on 28-07-2017

The Elephant Rope

As a man visiting a circus was passing through the area of the elephants, when he suddenly stopped, confused by the fact that these huge creatures were being held by only a small rope tied to their front leg. No chains, no cages. It was obvious that the elephants could, at any time, break away from their bonds but for some reason, they did not.

He saw a trainer nearby and asked why these animals just stood there and made no attempt to get away. “Well,” trainer said, “when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and, at that age, it’s enough to hold them. As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.”

The man was amazed. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds but because they believed they couldn’t, they were stuck right where they were.

Comment: Like the elephants, how many of us go through life hanging onto a belief that we cannot do something, simply because we failed at it once before? Failure is part of learning; we should never give up the struggle in life.

By indian-admin on 25-07-2017

The Farmer and the Stork  

Finding that cranes were destroying his newly sown corn, a farmer one evening set a net in his field to catch the destructive birds. When he went to examine the net next morning he found a number of cranes and also a stork.

“Release me, I beseech you,” cried the stork, “for I have eaten none of your corn, nor have I done you any harm. I am a poor innocent stork, as you may see – a most dutiful bird, I honour my father and mother. I…”

But the farmer cut him short. “All this may be true enough, I dare say, but I have caught you with those who were destroying my crops, and you must suffer with the company in which you are found.”

Moral: You are judged by the company you keep.

By indian-admin on 08-07-2017